2014-01-04

Job Quest

Job Quest is a Twine game I made in about a week. Twine games are published as web sites, so anyone with internet access should be able to play the game.


Artwork by Marc d'Entremont

It’ll only take you about five or ten minutes. There are a few endings (you’ll reach a “Game Over” or end screen).

This is the first video game that I publicly release. Even though it’s only a small project, it feels good to finally get something out there.

You can also check it out on textadventures.co.uk or on ifdb.tads.org and write a review! I appreciate all feedback.

You can make interactive stories too!

I used a program called Twine to make this interactive story. It’s a free, easy-to-use tool that has lots of potential.

As you may have guessed while playing Job Quest, I’m not the best writer. I'd love to collaborate with people interested in writing interactive stories to create Twine games.

If you like creative writing and would like to give interactive stories a try, talk to me!

A growing collection of Twine games can be found online (here, here, or here, for example). Since it's such an accessible tool, lots of weird and unconventional games are being made. And that’s great!

The Job Quest Twine file. You can see the connections between passages.

About Job Quest

Here are a few more details about the game. Some of this might not make sense if you haven’t played the game yet.

My goal was to re-create the stress and frustration that I felt when starting to work full-time. Before designing the game, I knew Twine could create games that loop endlessly, and I had previously played a flash game and a Twine game about a looping work day.

From there, I got the idea of having X amount needs but only being able to satisfy some of them. Five and two made sense since you can accomplish a couple things per evening but become overwhelmed over time.

Then, probably influenced by Papers, Please, I decided to add events and other elements to mix things up and increase frustration.

The work day loops infinitely. I didn’t include weekends or other breaks in order to keep the game short. The effects of neglecting needs are exagerated to show their long-term effects without having to play for long.

Thanks again to Norm Pothier, Suzanne Lapointe, Jesse Waterman, and Alex Deveau, who helped me out with testing. For the updated version of the game, I used a custom stylesheet from glorioustrainwrecks.com.

Hyperlinks can power an interactive poem, a choose-your-own-adventure full of gruesome deaths, a dungeon crawler tracking stats and inventory, a strategy game, wherever yOuR iMaGiNaTiOn TaKeS yOu - Porpentine

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